The Rhode Island Historical Society presents: The Transit of Venus

In June of 2012, don’t miss the truly once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to observe the Transit of Venus; it won’t happen again until 2117! First on Sunday, June 3rd, learn more about the 1769 Transit on a walking tour of Providence’s East Side, exploring the very site where the Transit was observed almost 250 years ago.  Then, on Tuesday, June 5th, join us at the Museum of Natural History and Planetarium in Roger Williams Park to view the Transit via a live telecast!  Eclipse glasses will be provided. For more information or to practice viewing the transit, please visit the Events page at http://www.rihs.org.

Part 1 – The Transit of Venus Walking Tour.

DATE:
Sunday, June 3, 2012

TIME:
2 p.m.

WHERE:
Depart from the John Brown House Museum, 52 Power Street, Providence

Part 2 – A live telecast of the Transit of Venus.

DATE:
Tuesday, June 5, 2012

TIME:
6 p.m.

WHERE:
The Museum of Natural History and Planetarium at Roger Williams Park, 1000 Elmwood Avenue, Providence

CONTACT:
Caitlin Murphy, 401-331-8575 x36 or cmurphy@rihs.org

COST:
$12 per person for both events, or $8 per person for one. Kids under 12 free. Reservations for walking tour required.

Transit of Venus

The 1769 and 2012 Transits of Venus, a Program in Two Parts

Have you ever wondered where Planet and Transit Streets in Providence got their names? On a clear June morning in 1769, a crowd gathered near a tall wooden platform, curiously watching gentlemen like Joseph Brown, his brother Moses, Stephen Hopkins and others using a telescope to observe the Transit of Venus.  The streets near their makeshift observatory now bear the memory of their amazing experiment.

In June of 2012, don’t miss the truly once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to observe the Transit of Venus; it won’t happen again until 2117! First on Sunday, June 3rd, learn more about the 1769 Transit on a walking tour of Providence’s East Side, exploring the very site where the Transit was observed almost 250 years ago.  Then, on Tuesday, June 5th, join us at the Museum of Natural History and Planetarium in Roger Williams Park to view the Transit via a live telecast!  Eclipse glasses will be provided. For more information or to practice viewing the transit, please visit the Events page at http://www.rihs.org.

The Rhode Island Historical Society is dedicated to collecting, preserving, and sharing Rhode Island’s history. Founded in 1822, the RIHS is the fourth oldest state historical society in the United States. It is a private organization, founded and supported by its membership.

The RIHS holds the largest and most important historical collections relating to Rhode Island. The Society owns and maintains the John Brown House Museum, a National Historic Landmark built in 1788 and is one of early American’s grandest mansions and Rhode Island’s most famous 18th century home; the Aldrich House, also a National Historic Landmark, built in 1822; and the Library of Rhode Island History. The organization also maintains the Museum of Work and Culture, a regional history museum devoted to the history of northern Rhode Island.

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